*~*Hi! Welcome To My Blog*~*
Because lying to your kids about sex helps nobody. Telling them that sex is “only between mommies and daddies” is a lie that leads to confused, hormone charged teenagers. Telling them that sex is “only something that happens when two people love each other very much” is a lie that causes hormone charged teenagers to confuse “love” with “lust,” or “obsession.” It leads to leaps of logic like, “If I have sex with them, we must be in love.” Or worse- “If I love them, I have to have sex with them.” And how many teenage tragedies are based on that misconception?
You might think: who is this Harry Potter girl? What is she doing at the UN? I’ve been asking myself at the same thing. All I know is that I care about this problem and I want to make this better. And having seen what I’ve seen and given the chance, I feel my responsibility to say something.

It is time that we all see gender as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals. We should stop defining each other by what we are not, and start defining ourselves by who we are.

I want men to take up this mantle so their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human, too and in doing so, be a more true and complete version of themselves.
productiveslacker:

remember when Rabbit made a decorative and functional wall piece out of Pooh’s ass?

productiveslacker:

remember when Rabbit made a decorative and functional wall piece out of Pooh’s ass?

gothway:

pre-frank my chemical romance circa. 2001-02
[source]

wasthatnotsideblog:

just gonna say this: if someone has social anxiety and they ask you something akin to ‘are you mad at me’ or ‘do you hate me’, it isn’t because they don’t trust you, it’s because their brain literally tells them that all the time

it’s not a personal slight, it’s insecurity caused by mental illness

thanks

inheritedloss:

hey sooooo remember how the police in ferguson were going to start wearing body cameras

the police officers’ union is bringing out every last excuse to keep it from actually happening

actual quote from the article: “This gotcha discipline that we have with the dash board cameras is what we’d be afraid of,” Roorda said.

"gotcha discipline"

basically “any tangible way of holding us accountable for abusing our power is what we’d be afraid of”

Dawn, Day, and Twilight, William Bouguereau

cc-randomness:

govthookercoulson:

cuntgradulation:

pantslesswrock:

joanna-kaana:

this is a necessity for me

dude the oxford comma is the shit i am all up on that bitch like woo woo





all right, you’ve convinced me. 

cc-randomness:

govthookercoulson:

cuntgradulation:

pantslesswrock:

joanna-kaana:

this is a necessity for me

dude the oxford comma is the shit i am all up on that bitch like woo woo

image

all right, you’ve convinced me. 

racebending:

The Redskins Nation citizens eagerly signed up, most of them knowing that they might be mocked in their interview with correspondent Jason Jones. But several hours into the Sept. 13 taping of the yet-to-air episode, the fans, all from Virginia, said they were suddenly confronted by a larger group of Native American activists — all of whom were in on the showdown prearranged by “The Daily Show.”

The encounter at a Dupont Circle hotel was so tense that an Alexandria fan said she left in tears and felt so threatened that she later called the police. She has told “The Daily Show” to leave her out of the segment but doesn’t know whether the producers will comply.

“This goes way beyond mocking. Poking fun is one thing, but that’s not what happened,” said Kelli O’Dell, 56, a former teacher who lives in Alexandria and doesn’t watch the show regularly. “It was disingenuous. The Native Americans accused me of things that were so wrong. I felt in danger. I didn’t consent to that. I am going to be defamed.”

If only the Native American activists protesting the racist R**** mascot knew what it was like to be falsely misrepresented and endangered without their consent, and defamed. They’d want to call the police, too.

In her essay "I’m Leaving!" White fragility in Racial Dialogues, Robin J. DiAngelo writes: ”fragility coupled with privilege will result in a response of resistance, indulgence in emotional incapacitation, exiting, or a combination of these.”

And they say people protesting the R**** mascot are the ones who are “too sensitive.”

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

deducingmindpalace:

skulls-and-tea:

The most non-responsive kiss on television, paired with the most deeply-repressed reaction of dismayed jealousy. It’s like peanut butter and chocolate.

Reblogging for that last comment